Society for Health Communication

The Society for Health Communication is a member-driven organization bringing together health communication professionals, students, and scholars from all of our diverse areas of teaching, research and practice.

By uniting our members, we're building a unified voice to shape and advance our field. We are an international organization, based in the USA, serving members from all countries.

Our steering committee is comprised of many of today's leading health communication practitioners, researchers, and thought leaders.

Summary

By uniting our members, we’re building a unified voice to shape and advance our field. We are an international organization, based in the USA, serving members from all countries.

Our steering committee is comprised of many of today’s leading health communication practitioners, researchers, and thought leaders.

Information

Website: societyforhealthcommunication.org/
Twitter:  @healthcommsoc   Vimeo

Email:  Admin@soceityforhealthcommunication.org
Address: 8127 Mesa Drive, Suite B206, PMB 343
Austin, TX 78759

Society Leadership

The Society is comprised of leading health communication professionals across various industries, including academia, non-profits, government, and the private sector. Our Steering Committee is actively involved in Society infrastructure and regularly interacts with our members.

Jay Bernhardt, PhD, MPH, Professor and Interim Dean, Moody College of Communication, University of Texas at Austin
Founder and Steering Committee Chair

Executive Director
Erin Edgerton Norvell

Steering Committee Members
Timothy Edgar, Tufts University School of Medicine
Tony Foleno, The Ad Council
Deborah Glik, University of California, LA (UCLA)
Nancy Harrington, University of Kentucky
Lenora Johnson, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Sandra Jones, Australian Catholic University
Sanjay Koyani, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
Gary Kreps, George Mason University (GMU)
Katherine Lyon Daniel, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Mike Mackert, University of Texas at Austin
Claudia Parvanta, University of the Sciences
Scott Ratzan, Anheuser-Busch InBev
Stacy Robison, CommunicateHealth
Suzanne Suggs, Universitia della Svizzera Italiana

Meet Our Members

The success of our organization depends on the engagement, diversity and strength of our members. We are very pleased that the following organizations and individuals served as our initial foundation for launching the organization.

Organizational Members
Center for Health Communication, Moody College of Communication, University of Texas at Austin
College of Communications Arts and Sciences, Michigan State University
CommunicateHealth
Danya International
Porter Novelli
Founding Members
Beyond our individual memberships, the Society offers Founding Memberships to those individuals who are interested in taking a more active role in determining the direction and focus of our organization. We are very appreciative to have the following Founding Members who have been early supporters of the Society:

  • Lalatendu Acharya
  • Ann Aikin
  • Gary Ashwal
  • Joshua Barbour
  • Jay Bernhardt
  • Crystal Brandow
  • JoNise Caleb
  • Elisia Cohen
  • Heather Connor
  • Alicia Eberl-Lefko
  • Tim Edgar
  • Iris Feinberg
  • Tony Foleno
  • Marnie Glaeberman
  • Deborah Glik
  • Elizabeth Glowacki
  • Lori Hall
  • Nancy Harrington
  • Brad Hesse
  • Robert Hutson
  • Lenora Johnson
  • Sandra Jones
  • Karen Komondor
  • Gary Kreps
  • Sanjay Koyani
  • Kate Ksobiech
  • Jessica Leyendecker
  • Kenneth Lo
  • Brad Love
  • Max Lum
  • Katherine Lyon Daniel
  • Mike Mackert
  • Kate Magsamen
  • Jimmie Mannine
  • Ethna Mc Ferran
  • Christopher McIntyre
  • Judy Mendel
  • Lynda Mitchell
  • Karen Murray
  • Maram Museitif
  • Anne Nicotera
  • Erin Norvell
  • Yoko Onuma-Kawamura
  • Ronne Ostby
  • Sheri Parr
  • Claudia Parvanta
  • Keryn Pasch
  • Lucy Popova
  • A Susana Ramirez
  • Sara Rattigan
  • Scott Ratzan
  • Camella Rising
  • Jill Roark
  • Stacy Robison
  • Lise  Saffran
  • Emily Savage
  • Denise Scannell
  • Renata Schiavo
  • Holli Seitz
  • Melanie Smith
  • Suzanne Suggs
  • Daniel Taber
  • Anita Vangelist
  • Melinda Villagran
  • Josh West
  • Patrick Zickler

Our Activities

We’re passionate about health communication and changing the way our field works together. We believe that bringing together health communication professionals from all levels of government, nonprofits, industry, and academia will help strengthen our field. As we grow, our activities will be focused on the following three areas:

Education and advocacy

Raising awareness and support for our field
Ensuring that health communication plays an equal role in public health policy
Strengthening the work around critical health topics and priority focus areas

Best practices and information exchange

Finding out what works when it comes to behavior change and sharing what we know
Finding peer support and networking with others in our field
Connecting early career and advanced professionals to build mentorships

Quality assurance and training

Identifying a core set of competencies for people who work in health communication
Connecting you with training and professional development opportunities with partner organizations
In today’s technology-focused culture, we know that digital media will play a large role in how the Society functions. That’s why we’re committed to using digital tools to connect our members in communication, health care, public health, and communication technologies.

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Jay M. Bernhardt

Dean, Moody College of Communication, The University of Texas at Austin
Founding Director, Center for Health Communication
Walter Cronkite Regents Chair | Everett D. Collier Centennial Chair

Dr. Jay Bernhardt is the 6th Dean of the Moody College of Communication at The University of Texas at Austin, one of the largest and highest ranked colleges of communication in the country. He is recognized internationally as a visionary leader, respected scholar, and innovative scientist in the application of communication, marketing, media to public health, healthcare, and medicine. Dr. Bernhardt serves on numerous national boards and four editorial boards. He is a member of six honor societies and and has received numerous awards for his scholarship and leadership.

Summary

Dr. Jay Bernhardt is the 6th Dean of the Moody College of Communication at The University of Texas at Austin, one of the largest and highest ranked colleges of communication in the country. He is recognized internationally as a visionary leader, respected scholar, and innovative scientist in the application of communication, marketing, media to public health, healthcare, and medicine. Dr. Bernhardt serves on numerous national boards and four editorial boards. He is a member of six honor societies and and has received numerous awards for his scholarship and leadership.

Information

Webpage:    commstudies.utexas.edu/faculty/jay-m-bernhardt
Twitter:  @jaybernhardt
LinkedIn    Blog
Full CV

Email:  moody.dean@austin.utexas.edu
Phone: 512-471-5646
Address: BMC 5.312
The University of Texas at Austin
Department of Communication Studies
2504A Whitis Ave. (A1105)
Austin, TX 78712-0115

Biosketch

Dr. Jay Bernhardt (Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1999; M.P.H., Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 1994) is the 6th Dean of the Moody College of Communication at The University of Texas at Austin, one of the largest and highest ranked colleges of communication in the country. Dr. Bernhardt also serves as the Founding Director of the Center for Health Communication and holds the Walter Cronkite Regents Chair and the DeWitt Carter Reddick Regents Chair in Communication. He is Adjunct Professor at The University of Texas School of Public Health. Before UT, Dr. Bernhardt served as Chair, Professor, and Center Director at the University of Florida in Gainesville, and previously served on the faculty of Emory University in Atlanta and the University of Georgia in Athens.

From 2005 to 2010, Dr. Bernhardt led health communication and marketing at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, managing a staff of more than 500 and a budget of more than $100 million. He is recognized internationally as a visionary leader, respected scholar, and innovative scientist in the application of communication, marketing, media to public health, healthcare, and medicine. Dr. Bernhardt serves on numerous national boards and four editorial boards. He is a member of six honor societies and and has received numerous awards for his scholarship and leadership.

Affiliations

Founding Director, Center for Health Communication, Moody College of Communication and Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin, 2014-Present.

Adjunct Professor, Austin Regional Campus, The University of Texas Health Science Center School of Public Health at Houston, September 2014-Present.

Selected Publications

Glowacki, E.M., Lazard, A.J., Wilcox, G.B., Mackert, M., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2016). Identifying the public’s concerns and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s reactions during a health crisis: An analysis of the CDC’s Zika live Twitter chat. American Journal of Infection Control. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2016.05.025

Livingood, W.C., Monticalvo, D., Bernhardt, J.N., Wells, K.T., Harris, T., Kee, K., Hayes, J., George, D., & Woodhouse, L.D. (2016). Engaging Adolescents Through Participatory and Qualitative Research Methods to Develop a Digital Communication Intervention to Reduce Adolescent Obesity, Health Education & Behavior. doi: 10.1177/1090198116677216

Mackert, M., Donovan, E., & Bernhardt J.M. (2016). Applied Grant Writing Training for Future Health Communication Researchers: The Health Communication Scholars Program. Health Communication. doi: 10.1080/10410236.2015.1110686.

Lazard, A., Scheinfeld, E., Bernhardt, J.M., Wilcox, G., & Suran, M. (2015). Detecting themes of public concern: a text mining analysis of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Ebola live Twitter chat. American Journal of Infection Control. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2015.05.025.

Alber, J., Watson, A., Barnett, T., Mercado, R., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2015). Development of a coding instrument to assess the quality and content of anti-tobacco video games. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 18(7): 417-425. doi:10.1089/cyber.2015.0051.

Hall, A. K., Bernhardt, J. M., & Dodd, V. (2015). Older adults use of online and offline sources of health information and constructs of reliance and self-efficacy for medical decision making. Journal of Health Communication, 20(7), 751-758. DOI:10.1080/10810730.2015.1018603.

Hall, A.K., Cole-Lewis, H., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2015). Mobile text messaging for health: A systematic review of reviews. Annual Review of Public Health, 36, 1-29.23. DOI: 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-031914-122855.

Bernhardt, J.M., Alber, J., & Gold, R.S. (2014). A primer on social media for professionals: digital dos and don’ts. Health Promotion Practice. DOI: 10.1177/1524839913517235.

Bernhardt, J.M., Mays, D., & Hall, A.K. (2012). Social marketing at the right place and right time with new media. Journal of Social Marketing, 2, 2, 130-137.

Hall, A.K., Stellefson, M., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2012) Healthy Aging 2.0: The potential of new media and technology. Preventing Chronic Disease, 9, 110241. DOI: 10.5888/pcd9.110241.

Bernhardt, J.M., Mays, D., & Kreuter, M. (2011). Dissemination 2.0: Closing the gap between knowledge and practice with new media and marketing. Journal of Health Communication, 16s1, 32-44.

Bernhardt, J.M., Usdan, S., Mays, D., Arriola, K.J., Martin, R.J., Cremeens, J., & Arriola, K.J. (2009). Alcohol assessment among college students using wireless mobile technology. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 70, 771-775.

Bernhardt, J.M., Mays, D., Eroğlu, D., & Daniel, K.L. (2009) New communication channels: Changing the nature of customer engagement, Social Marketing Quarterly, 15, 7-15.

Kreuter, M.W., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2009). Reframing the dissemination challenge: A marketing and distribution perspective. American Journal of Public Health, 99, 2123-2127.

Lyon Daniel, K., Bernhardt, J.M., & Eroglu, D., (2009). Social marketing and health communication: From people to places, American Journal of Public Health, 99, 2120-2122.

Mays, D., Bernhardt, J.M. et al. (2009). Development and validation of the Retrospective Alcohol Context Scale, American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 35, 109-114.

Mays, D., Klaiman, T., Kumanyika, S., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2008). A call to action to address diversity in public health professional preparation, Journal of Diversity in Health and Social Care, 8, 207-214.

Hayden, J., Cottrell, R., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2008). Ascending the career ladder, with Dr. Jay Bernhardt. Health Promotion Practice, 9, 1, 12-15.

Bernhardt, J.M., Usdan, S., Mays, D., Arriola, K.J., Martin, R.J., Cremeens, J., McGill, T., & Weitzel, J.A. (2007). Alcohol assessment using wireless handheld computers: A pilot study. Addictive Behaviors, 32, 12, 3065-3070.

Weitzel, J.A., Bernhardt, J.M., Usdan, S., Mays, D., & Glanz, K. (2007). Using wireless handheld computers and tailored text messaging to reduce negative consequences of drinking alcohol. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 68, 534-537.

Bernhardt, J.M. (2006). Improving health through Health Marketing. Preventing Chronic Disease, 3, 1-3.

Bernhardt, J.M., Usdan, S.L., & Burnett, A. (2005). Using handheld computers for daily alcohol assessment: Results from a pilot study. Journal of Substance Use, 10, 347-353.

Bernhardt, J.M. (2004). Communication at the core of effective public health. American Journal of Public Health, 94, 12, 2051-2053.

Bernhardt, J.M., & Felter, E.M. (2004). Online pediatric information seeking among mothers of young children: Results from a qualitative study using focus groups. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 6, e7.

Bernhardt, J.M., Lariscy, R.A., Parrott, R.L., Silk, K.J., & Felter, E.M. (2002). Perceived barriers to Internet-based health communication on human genetics. Journal of Health Communication, 7, 4, 325-340.

Bernhardt, J.M., Strecher, V.J., Bishop, K., Potts, P., Madison, E.M., & Thorp, J. (2001). Handheld computer-assisted self-interviews: User comfort level and preferences. American Journal of Health Behavior, 25, 6, 557-563.

Bernhardt, J.M., Sorenson, J.R., & Brown, J.D. (2001). When the perpetrator gets killed: Effects of a televised narrative anti-violence public service announcement. Health Education & Behavior, 28, 1, 81-94.

Bernhardt, J.M., & Hubley, J. (2001). Health education and the Internet: The start of a revolution. Health Education Research, 16, 6.

Bernhardt, J.M. (2000). Health education and the digital divide: Building bridges and filling chasms. Health Education Research, 15, 527-531.

Interview with Gary Kreps

Saturday April, 29, 2017

Fairfax Hyatt Regency, Fairfax, VA
Link to Award post

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=poa0WGSxvj0

Atkin Award Presentation

Saturday April, 29, 2017 at noon
Fairfax Hyatt Regency, Fairfax, VA

Download (PDF, Unknown)

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Erin Edgerton Norvell

Founder and Principal Strategist, Digital Edge Communications
Executive Director, Society for Health Communication

I am a senior health marketing and communication professional with more than 10 years of experience working with mission-driven organizations to develop and implement innovative communication strategies that improve public health and safety, raise awareness for critical public health issues, and integrate digital and traditional media channels for maximum health impact. I'm also a champion for innovation and experienced in fostering strategic internal and external partnerships.

Summary

I am a senior health marketing and communication professional with more than 10 years of experience working with mission-driven organizations to develop and implement innovative communication strategies that improve public health and safety, raise awareness for critical public health issues, and integrate digital and traditional media channels for maximum health impact. I’m also a champion for innovation and experienced in fostering strategic internal and external partnerships.

Information

Web:  http://www.digitaledgecommunications.us

Linkedin      Twitter     BLOG
Email
:   ENorvell@digitaledgecommunications.us
Phone:  404-490-1491
Address:  Digital Edge Communications
1270 Caroline St. NE, #D120-237
Atlanta, GA 30307

Biosketch

Erin Edgerton Norvell is a senior health marketing and communication professional with more than 10 years of experience working with mission-driven organizations to develop and implement innovative communication strategies that improve public health and safety, raise awareness for critical public health issues, and integrate digital and traditional media channels for maximum health impact. She is a champion for innovation within established organizations and an expert at fostering internal and external collaborations.  She is a solution-oriented leader capable of building strategic partnerships, managing diverse teams, and delivering results on time and within budget.

Erin played a key role in high-profile government public health initiatives, including serving as the Director of New Media and Strategic Communications for the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy and a New Media Analyst for White House Office of New Media, where she served as the liaison for health-related digital projects, including health care implementation, the H1N1 response, and the First Lady’s Let’s Move! initiative.  Erin also worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where she helped found the agency’s first centralized social media strategy, including launching some of CDC’s first social media channels and developing internal policies and guidance.  She also served as Senior Director for Health Communication and Digital Solutions at Danya International, where she led a team of health communication professionals focused on elevating the company’s approach to integrated communications and strategic partnerships. In addition to her current work with Digital Edge Communications, she also serves as the Executive Director of the newly-launched Society for Health Communication, a nonprofit aimed at bringing together health communication professionals in the diverse areas of academia, research, and practice.

Education

Emerson College
M.A., Health Communications
2003 – 2005

University of Maryland College Park
B.A.,Public Relations
1997 – 2001

Experience

Founder & Principal Strategist 
Digital Edge Communications
Atlanta, GA

After more than 10 years working in public health, I founded and currently serve as the Principal Strategist at Digital Edge Communications, a boutique consulting firm that brings together strategy, innovation, and health communication. We lead our clients through a systematic process to develop and implement communication strategies, leverage health communication theories and evidence-based best practices, and advance innovation through the effective use of digital media and emerging technologies. Learn more: www.digitaledgecommunications.us

Executive Director
Society for Health Communication

As the inaugural Executive Director, I’m working to build and grow this new member-driven non-profit organization. At the Society, we focus on bridging the gap between public health, healthcare, digital health, academia, and research. To put it simply, we believe we’re stronger together. That’s why we’re working to change the way health communication professionals collaborate and build a united voice in the field.

Senior Director for Communication Strategy and Digital Solutions
Danya International – Atlanta, Jan 2012 – Feb 2015

As Danya’s Senior Director for Communication Strategy and Digital Solutions, I served as a member of the senior leadership team charged with elevating the company’s approach to integrated communications, building and maintaining partnerships, maximizing corporate efficiency, securing new business, and advancing the company’s mission to create positive social impact. In addition, I worked with a variety of clients to develop and implement innovative health communication strategies that demonstrated research-based and data-driven best practices and leveraged emerging technologies.

Director, New Media and Strategic Communications
The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy
Washington DC   Feb 2010 – Feb 2012

As part of ONDCP’s Office of Public Affairs, I led the agency’s strategic communications and social media activities, including developing, implementing, and evaluating the agency’s overarching strategic communication plan and individual messaging strategies for priority issues. To achieve this, I developed long-lead communication strategies, strategic partnerships, and press materials, including news releases, speeches, and social media content. I also created digital media tools to increase engagement among key audiences, including establishing the first ONDCP website hosted on WhiteHouse.gov.

New Media Analyst
The White House Office of Digital Strategy
Washington DC   Sep 2009 – Oct 2010

In order to support and amplify the President’s messages, I developed and executed digital media strategies related to high-priority government initiatives, including healthcare implementation, the First Lady’s Let’s Move! campaign, the H1N1 digital emergency response strategy, food safety issues, and the Open Government initiative.

Recent Presentations

Six Steps for Building a Content Strategy: Government Edition (May, 2016)

Government agencies strive to provide high-quality, engaging content but are often left wondering if their content is effective and how it can be better organized across various layers of the organization. To answer these questions, government agencies need a strategic, coordinated, and user-centered approach to developing, delivering, and evaluating their content offerings. A content strategy bridges the gap between an organization’s goals and the target audiences’ needs, and develops performance measures to evaluate content. This presentation outlines six steps for creating a content strategy and provides recommendations on how this work should be completed by the global brand (leadership level), by the subunits (topic-specific groups), or through a collaborative effort between both groups.

This presentation was adapted from it’s original cross-industry version and presented to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Digital Council.

View the presentation

Get Linked In & Linked Up: Using Social Media for Professional Networking (May,  2016)

The best way to use social media for professional networking is to use it effectively in your day-to-day life. Through this presentation, you will learn how to: create a professional digital profile, find your voice and create fresh social media content, use LinkedIn and Twitter effectively for networking, and build lasting professional relationships.

This presentation was developed for the American Public Health Association (APHA) as part of their resources for early career professionals.

View the presentation

Read the blog post

When Every Word Counts: Developing a Substance Abuse Communication Strategy on a Tight Budget (February, 2016)

Substance abuse is a complex public health issue that leaves many of today’s community organizations struggling and overwhelmed.  With more Americans dying each year from drug overdoses than motor vehicle crashes, there’s a huge need for policy and communication teams to affect change at the local level. However, too often tight budgets lead to generalized messaging and outreach tactics. While initially appealing, the approach of reaching as many people as possible often lacks the message tailoring strategies needed to elicit behavior change. Developing an effective communication strategy can be challenging for anyone, especially community organizations working with limited planning and implementation budgets.

This presentation is an excerpt of the full training and provides an overview of the key steps in developing a substance abuse communication strategy. The full training includes details on drafting target audience personas, setting measureable communication goals, integrating traditional and digital media, leveraging storytelling best practices, developing effective calls-to-action, and tracking progress over time. This presentation was delivered at the Agents of Change Summit in San Diego, CA.

View the presentation

 

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