#NotOkay

 Stories about abuse on Instagram and Twitter

Presenter:  Jeanine Guidry

Jeanine Guidry, Virginia Commonwealth University
Caroline Orr, Virginia Commonwealth University
Kellie Carlyle, Virginia Commonwealth University

In the current study, a quantitative content analysis was conducted on a random sample of 1,000 Instagram posts and 1,000 tweets using the hashtag #NotOkay. The analysis focused specifically on the type of information included, the frequency of engagement by users on both types of posts, and a comparison between the two platforms. Recognizing that sexual abuse is embedded within a larger sociocultural context, we conceptualized the analysis using the Social Ecological Model as the theoretical framework.

Summary

Jeanine Guidry, Virginia Commonwealth University
Caroline Orr, Virginia Commonwealth University
Kellie Carlyle, Virginia Commonwealth University

In the current study, a quantitative content analysis was conducted on a random sample of 1,000 Instagram posts and 1,000 tweets using the hashtag #NotOkay. The analysis focused specifically on the type of information included, the frequency of engagement by users on both types of posts, and a comparison between the two platforms. Recognizing that sexual abuse is embedded within a larger sociocultural context, we conceptualized the analysis using the Social Ecological Model as the theoretical framework.

Abstract

#NotOkay: Stories about abuse on Instagram and Twitter

At the height of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, tens of thousands of women started sharing their experiences of sexual assault on Twitter and Instagram in response to a video showing presidential candidate Donald Trump boasting about groping women. Using the hashtag #NotOkay, the outpouring of personal stories brought attention to the pervasiveness of rape culture in America and its impact on women and girls nationwide. Social media platforms and mobile technologies are playing an increasingly important role in both increasing public awareness about sexual abuse as well as giving a voice to abuse victims who have not shared their stories previously, with the 2014 #WhyIleft/#WhyIstayed Twitter conversations as a prominent example. However, not much is known about how these stories are shared on visual platforms such as Instagram, and how these conversations may differ as they unfold on platforms like Twitter and Instagram.

In the current study, a quantitative content analysis was conducted on a random sample of 1,000 Instagram posts and 1,000 tweets using the hashtag #NotOkay. The analysis focused specifically on the type of information included, the frequency of engagement by users on both types of posts, and a comparison between the two platforms. Recognizing that sexual abuse is a problem embedded within a larger sociocultural context, we conceptualized the analysis using the Social Ecological Model as the theoretical framework.

This study is ongoing and will be completed by August 1, 2017. The results will provide insight into the diverse personal accounts of sexual abuse, as well as the role of social media in facilitating such discussions. Implications for activism and bystander intervention will also be discussed.

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#Zika on Instagram#Zika on Instagram

How publics discuss the health crisis through online visuals and text

Presenter: Jeanine Guidry, Virginia Commonwealth University

Social media is now one of the primary places where people seek out information about the Zika virus. However, little is known about the content of these messages and about their public engagement. In addition, visual social media platforms like Instagram are under-studied in social media research. These visual platforms are particularly significant because of the different manner visuals are processed as compared to text-based messages. Therefore, the goal of this study is to determine how the public is talking about and responding to conversations about a current infectious disease outbreak, Zika, on visual social media platform Instagram.

Summary

Social media is now one of the primary places where people seek out information about the Zika virus. However, little is known about the content of these messages and about their public engagement. In addition, visual social media platforms like Instagram are under-studied in social media research. These visual platforms are particularly significant because of the different manner visuals are processed as compared to text-based messages. Therefore, the goal of this study is to determine how the public is talking about and responding to conversations about a current infectious disease outbreak, Zika, on visual social media platform Instagram.

Abstract

#Zika on Instagram: How publics discuss the health crisis through online visuals and text

Until recently, Zika was relatively obscure disease with only 14 cases documented worldwide before 2007 (CDC, 2016a). Prior to 2015, Zika outbreaks had only occurred in parts of Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands; however, in May 2015 the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) confirmed the first known case in Brazil (Lupton, 2016). Currently, outbreaks are occurring in many countries, and local mosquito-borne Zika cases have been reported in the U.S. in Florida and Texas (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2016b). Additionally, this recent outbreak of the Zika virus has been associated with a dramatically increased incidence of microcephaly in newborns whose mothers were infected with Zika (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2016a).

Social media is now one of the primary places where people seek out information about the Zika virus. However, little is known about the content of these messages and about their public engagement. In addition, visual social media platforms like Instagram are under-studied in social media research. These visual platforms are particularly significant because of the different manner visuals are processed as compared to text-based messages (Houts, Doak, Doak, & Loscalzo, 2006). Therefore, the goal of this study is to determine how the public is talking about and responding to conversations about a current infectious disease outbreak, Zika, on visual social media platform Instagram. This analysis will shed light on current trends in social media engagement surrounding this key health topic, and will provide health professionals and communications practitioners with important insights to improve the dissemination of information about infectious diseases and better engage with audiences on visual social media platforms.

This study, using a quantitative content analysis, analyzed a random sample of 1,000 Instagram posts, published between September-November 2016 and which included the hashtags #Zika and #ZikaVirus, focusing specifically on the type of information included, and the frequency of likes and comments on these posts. Further analyses on the public’s social media engagement will focus on health behavior and risk perception theories (Covello, Peters, Wojtecki, & Hyde, 2001).

The study is currently ongoing and will be completed by February 1, 2017. The findings will provide insight for health communication researchers and practitioners about how the Zika virus is portrayed on Instagram, how the Zika outbreak should be approached on visual platforms like Instagram from a public health perspective, and how public health communities can engage publics more effectively during an outbreak of this kind.

Slide Presentation

Panel Debriefing and Discussion

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QCUVg8_d-o

Special Zika Aircast at DCHC 2017

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1yp0ChpmOM

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Pinning about #IPV

The discussion about intimate partner violence on Pinterest"

Presenters:
Jeanine Guidry and Caroline Orr

Co-author:
Kellie Carlyle,
Virginia Commonwealth University

The results show that victim blaming was present in 11.7% (n=88) of the sample, 8% (n=60) mentioned rape, 10.5% (n=75) mentioned bystander intervention (either the presence of or encouragement to), and 13.5% (n=102) mentioned homicide.

In addition, study results suggest that mentioning physical abuse may have an effect on Pinterest engagement... and suggest that when Pinterest users mention or show psychological abuse in pins, engagement with their pins increases.

Summary

Co-author:
Kellie Carlyle,
Virginia Commonwealth University

The results show that victim blaming was present in 11.7% (n=88) of the sample, 8% (n=60) mentioned rape, 10.5% (n=75) mentioned bystander intervention (either the presence of or encouragement to), and 13.5% (n=102) mentioned homicide.

In addition, study results suggest that mentioning physical abuse may have an effect on Pinterest engagement… and suggest that when Pinterest users mention or show psychological abuse in pins, engagement with their pins increases.

Abstract

Pinning about #IPV: The discussion about intimate partner violence on Pinterest

The term “intimate partner violence”(IPV) refers to a broad range of abusive behaviors, including “physical and sexual violence, threats of physical or sexual violence, and psychological or emotional abuse by a current or former spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, or cohabitating partner” (Breiding, Black, & Ryan, 2008). Recent data indicate that approximately one in three women and one in four men have physical abuse by an intimate partner in their lifetime, and nearly half have experienced psychological abuse.

Despite increasing awareness of the problem, the prevalence of IPV has remained relatively unchanged for at least two decades, presenting a significant challenge for practitioners and scientists working in the field of violence prevention. One explanation for the continuing epidemic of IPV is the lack of social responsibility attributed to the issue and the pervasiveness of victim-blaming attitudes in media and society (Gracia & Herrero, 2007). In fact, studies suggest that media representations are one of the most powerful influences on public perceptions about crime and victimization (Haider-Markel & Joslyn, 2001), particularly regarding attributions of responsibility for the causes of and solutions to violence.

While previous studies have established the profound impact of traditional media coverage of IPV on public opinion and perceptions of the issue, there is a dearth of evidence on the portrayal of IPV on various social media channels, such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. According to the latest estimates from the Pew Research Center, more than 60% of the entire adult population in the U.S. uses at least one of these social media platforms, and that number continues to grow (Duggan, Ellison, Lampe, Lenhart, & Madden, 2015). Therefore, social media may represent a particularly rich source of data for understanding public perceptions of IPV from a novel viewpoint. Based on the characteristics of Pinterest and its users, this platform may represent a unique and salient avenue for IPV-related information.

This study analyzed IPV-related posts on social media platform Pinterest using a quantitative content analysis of 750 randomly selected pins that used either keyword “IPV/Intimate Partner Violence” or “Domestic Violence”.

The results show that victim blaming was present in 11.7% (n=88) of the sample, 8% (n=60) mentioned rape, 10.5% (n=75) mentioned bystander intervention (either the presence of or encouragement to), and 13.5% (n=102) mentioned homicide. In addition, study results suggest that mentioning physical abuse may have an effect on Pinterest engagement. Specifically, the results suggest that when Pinterest users mention or show physical abuse in pins, engagement with their pins decreases. In addition, these results suggest that when Pinterest users mention or show psychological abuse in pins, engagement with their pins increases.

Finally, the results suggest that mentioning individual level factors for preventing or stopping IPV also may have an effect on Pinterest engagement: when Pinterest users mention individual level factors in their pins, engagement with their pins increases, while the mention of societal/policy level factors is associated with decreased Pinterest engagement.

Slide Presentation

Panel Debriefing & Discussion

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sbDng1IRkUo

 

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