Camella J. RisingCamella J. Rising

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
Communication Doctoral Student and Graduate Lecturer, George Mason University

Hub Tags: Health Communication Hub | Family Communication

Interests: health, lifespan, and family communication in the context of prostate cancer, breast cancer, and other serious illness

Summary

Hub Tags: Health Communication Hub | Family Communication

Interests: health, lifespan, and family communication in the context of prostate cancer, breast cancer, and other serious illness

Information

Focus:   Health Care Delivery   eHealth

Research Gate web pagehttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Camella_Rising

Email:  crising@gmu.edu
Address: Fairfax, VA

Biosketch

I am a third-year doctoral student in the Department of Communication at George Mason University.

I have 15 years of experience as a registered dietitian nutritionist, particularly in the area of public health nutrition.

Papers

Perceptions of parental nutrition communication strategies predict diet quality of adolescents with early menarche (FLASHE Study)

Conclusions: Results suggest diet quality of adolescents with early menarche may improve when strategies include parents purchasing fruits/vegetables; limiting purchase of junk foods/sugary drinks; not allowing junk foods/sugary drinks to emotionally cope; and setting limits without over-regulating intake of junk foods/sugary drinks. Findings can be used to develop or refine guidance for families, with the goal of helping adolescent girls attain or maintain a healthy body weight. Families with Black adolescent girls may particularly benefit from such guidance.

Panel Presentation and Discussion

The Role of Communication in Addressing Obesity and Diet-Related Concerns

Friday April 27, 2017
DCHC 2017 “Patient-Centered Health Communication” Conference

Debriefing Panel Discussion

Interplay between Online and Offline Patient-Centered Health Communication

Friday April 28, 2017
DCHC 2017 “Patient-Centered Health Communication” Conference

This panel focuses on tailored information, or information adapted to the specific preferences of an individual, and how it is intended to reach and affect patients with a greater likelihood than standardized information.

Together, the presenters on this panel will provide a more comprehensive understanding of how to optimize patient-centered communication by considering the active ingredients of both offline and online tailored health communication.

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Gary Kreps 2Gary Kreps

University Distinguished Professor, Department of Communication, George Mason University
Director, Center for Health and Risk Communication

Gary Kreps' areas of expertise include health communication and promotion, information dissemination, organizational communication, information technology, multicultural relations, risk/crisis management, health informatics, and applied research methods.

Dr. Kreps is an advisor to numerous health communications-related organizations including the Open Network Alliance onHealth Hubs.

Summary

Gary Kreps’ areas of expertise include health communication and promotion, information dissemination, organizational communication, information technology, multicultural relations, risk/crisis management, health informatics, and applied research methods.

Dr. Kreps is an advisor to numerous health communications-related organizations including the Open Network Alliance onHealth Hubs.

Information

GMU website    CHRC website
Latest April 2016 CV
Wikipedia page   LinkedIn page

Email: gkreps@gmu.edu
Phone: 703.993.1094
Office Hours:
Address:  Robinson Hall A 339AB
Fairfax, Va. 22030

Biosketch

Gary L. Kreps is a University Distinguished Professor of the Department of Communication at George Mason University. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Communication Research, Health Communication, Organizational Communication, Consumer-Provider Health Communication, Health Communication Campaigns, and E-Health Communication.

Education

Dr. Kreps received his BA and his MA in Communication from the University of Colorado, Boulder and his PhD from the University of Southern California.

Areas of expertise

Dr. Kreps’ areas of expertise include health communication and promotion, information dissemination, organizational communication, information technology, multicultural relations, risk/crisis management, health informatics, and applied research methods.

Positions

He is the Director of the Center for Health and Risk Communication, serves on the Governing Board of the Center for Social Science Research, and is a faculty affiliate of the National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, the Center for Health Policy Research and Ethics, the Center for the Study of International Medical Policies and Practices, Center for Climate Change Communication, the Center for Consciouness and Transformation, and the Center for Health Information Technology, at George Mason.

Prior to his appointment at Mason, he served for five years as the founding Chief of the Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch at the National Cancer Institute (NIH), where he planned, developed, and coordinated major new national research and outreach initiatives concerning risk communication, health promotion, behavior change, technology development, and information dissemination to promote effective cancer prevention, screening, control, care, and survivorship. He also served as the Founding Dean of the School of Communication at Hofstra University in New York, Executive Director of the Greenspun School of Communication at UNLV, and in faculty and administrative roles at Northern Illinois, Rutgers, Indiana, and Purdue Universities.

His published work includes more than 350 books, articles, and monographs concerning the applications of communication knowledge in society.

For detailed information about Dr. Kreps’s career, research interests, and accomplishments, view his Curriculum Vitae.

Current Research

Working with:
National Minority AIDS Council to increase minority support for HIV vaccine research

Merck Pharmaceutical Inc to study ways to encourage patients with chronic deiseases to adhere to prescription medication instructions

Entertainment Industries Council to promote effective coverage of mental health issues in the media

National Recreation and Parks Association to evaluate the influences of revitalizing an inner-city DC park on minority youth physical activity and community public health policies

Fairfax County Health Literacy Initiative to enhance health information dissemination and support for vulnerable and at-risk populations in Northern Virginia.

Selected Publications

Kreps, G.L., Villagran, M.M., Zhao, X., McHorney, C., Ledford, C., Weathers, M., & Keefe, B.  (2011).  Developing and validating motivational message interventions for improving prescription drug adherence with consumers confronting chronic diseases.  In R. Batra, P. Anand Kellar, & V.J. Strecher.  (Eds.). Leveraging consumer psychology for effective health communications:  The obesity challenge (pp. 233-250).  Armonk, NY:  M.E. Sharpe.

Kreps, G.L., & Finney Rutten, L.  (2011).  Building the evidence base in cancer communication:  Next steps.  In L. Finney Rutten, B. Hesse, R. Moser, & G.L. Kreps, (Eds.), Building the evidence base in cancer communication (pp. 315-322).  Cresskill, NJ:  Hampton Press.

Kreps, G.L., & Neuhauser, L.  (2010).  New directions in ehealth communication:  Opportunities and challenges.  Patient Education and Counseling, 78, 329-336.

Kreps, G.L., & Maibach, E.W.  (2008).  Transdisciplinary science:  The nexus  between communication and  public health.  Journal of Communication, 58(4), 732-748.

Kreps, G.L., & Sivaram, R.  (2008).  The central role of strategic health communication in enhancing breast cancer outcomes across the continuum of care in limited-resource countries.  Cancer, 113(S8), 2331-2337.

Kreps, G.L.  (2008).  Strategic use of communication to market cancer prevention and control to  vulnerable populations.  Health Marketing Quarterly, 25(1/2), 204-216.

Kreps, G.L., Gustafson, D., Salovey, P., Perocchia, R.S., Wilbright, W., Bright, M.A., & Muha, C.  (2007).  The NCI Digital Divide Pilot Projects:  Implications for cancer education.  Journal of Cancer Education, 22 (Supplement 1), S56-S60.

Kreps, G.L.  (2006).  Communication and racial inequities in health care.  American Behavioral Scientist, 49(6), 760-774.

Courses

Fall 2016

COMM 620-001:
Health Communication
07:20 PM to 10:00 PM M

COMM 600-001:
Intro to Graduate Studies
04:30 PM to 07:10 PM M

Previous Courses Taught

399- Health Communication
400- Research Methods in Communication
600- Introduction to Graduate Studies
620- Health Communication

635- Organizational Communication
720- Consumer-Provided Health Communication
721- E-Health Communication

798- Communication Research Projects
820- Health Communication Campaigns

Center for Health and Risk Communication

About

Health and risk communication are areas of great interest and expertise within the Department of Communication and there are growing research and education programs at Mason in this area. Health and risk communication are important interrelated areas of study and application. Health communication examines the communication processes central to the delivery of health care and promotion of health, including health care provider consumer interactions, informed health care decision making, the provision of social support, the development and implementation of health promotion campaigns, and the uses of media and information technologies within the health care system. Risk communication examines strategic communication of serious health and safety risks to relevant publics, government officials, and first-responders, including media management, risk prevention, preparation, and response to health and crisis situations.

The Center for Health and Risk Communication (CHRC) provides an important organizational framework for stimulating innovative health and risk communication research collaborations, health promotion intervention projects, and community interventions. The establishment of the CHRC parallels the development of innovative new health and risk communication graduate programs at both the Masters and Doctoral levels within the Department of Communication, as well as the development of a strong cadre of distinguished faculty scholars with expertise in health and risk communication. Department faculty have received increased national and international recognition for their scholarship and growing external support for health and risk communication research educational activities from a variety of federal agencies and private foundations.

Active research collaborations have been established with leading health and safety scholars across George Mason University and many other national and international research centers. The Department has served as host for several distinguished international health and risk communication scholars who have engaged in collaborative research while at Mason.

The CHRC helps to connect the Department of Communication with a number of relevant external constituencies outside the university, such as the National Cancer Institute (NCI’s) Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, the NCI Cancer Information Service, the CDC’s National Center for Health Marketing, the AHRQ’s John M. Eisenberg Clinical Decisions and Communications Science Center, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Health e-Technologies Program, the Coalition for Health Communication, and a number of other important federal agencies and private foundations). There CHRC will be a focal point for plans to establish an innovative new DC-area Research Consortium of Health Communication Programs with collaborations between GMU, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Maryland, Georgetown University, George Washington University, and Howard University.

Information

Dept. webpages: communication.gmu.edu/research-and-centers/center-for-health-and-risk-communication

Email: hlthcomm@gmu.edu
Phone numbers: Communication Office: 703-993-1090; Gary Kreps, PhD: 703-993-1094
Address: Center for Health & Risk Communication
George Mason University
4400 University Drive, MS 3D6
Fairfax, VA 22030

D.C. Health Communication Conference (DCHC)

The 3rd Biennial D.C. Health Communication Conference (DCHC)
“Communication Competence and Health Promotion”
April 16-18, 2015, Hyatt at Fair Lakes Hotel & Conference Center, Fairfax, Virginia

The Center for Health & Risk Communication at George Mason University announces the innovative 2015 D.C. Health Communication Conference, “Communication Competence and Health Promotion,” April 16–18, 2015 at the Hyatt Fairfax at Fair Lakes. The DCHC conference will examine how health communication research, education, technologies, and policies can promote health and well-being. We will feature competitive papers, posters, and panels focusing on cutting edge health communication research and applications. Topics will examine sensitive communication in the delivery of care, strategic communication campaigns, evolving health information technologies, interactive health interventions, powerful media representations of health issues, and relevant new health communication programs, policies, and practices.

Advisory Boards

Center for Technology and Behavioral Health

Website      Center Leadership

CTBH brings together a diverse interdisciplinary team with expertise in behavioral health science, treatment, technology, health economics, ethics, regulation, and public policy.
The CTBH team shares a common goal of seeking to harness existing and emerging technologies to effectively develop and deliver evidence-based interventions for substance use and co-occurring disorders. CTBH faculty is organized into two primary cores: Scientific Core and Dissemination & Implementation Core. Core activities focus on identifying and studying state-of-the-art issues related to each of these core topics as they relate to technology-delivered therapeutic tools targeting behavioral health.

The Society for Health Communication

Website    Center Leadership

The Society for Health Communication brings together health communication professionals, students, and scholars to create meaningful connections across disciplines and advance the science of health communication. The Society is a member-driven organization that relies heavily on digital media to connect individuals from the diverse areas of teaching, research, and practice. If you share our interests in networking, best practices, advocacy, and training, we hope you’ll become a member today. We’re changing the way health communication professionals collaborate, and we want you to be part of that movement.

U-MD Center for Health and Risk Communication

Website   Advisory Board

We are an academic research unit of the University of Maryland committed to advancing interdisciplinary research and theory in health and risk communication; providing communication-based education and training related to health promotion, risk reduction, and resilience; promoting collaboration and dialogue among government, academia, and industry; and improving health and risk communication to inform and empower communities and individuals.

Videos

Workshop on Building Communication Capacity to Counter Infectious Disease Threats

Health Communication post on Workshop organized by Forum on Global Health – Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine

Webcast video

Session I: Laying the Foundation for Effective Communication 9:10 am PART A – An overview of successful communication capacity – Learning from the social/behavioral/decision science field(s) – Evidence-based methods and evaluation of strategies

Moderated by: Doug Storey

Speakers: Baruch Fischhoff, Carnegie Mellon University Angie Fagerlin, University of Utah Gary Kreps, George Mason University

Gary Kreps speaking at a workshop organized by the Forum on Global Health – Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine on December 13, 2016.

Gary Kreps speaking at a workshop organized by the Forum on Global Health – Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine on December 13, 2016.

Gary Kreps responding to question from moderator, Doug Storey

Gary Kreps responding to question from moderator, Doug Storey

How can we chart the future for digital health information systems?

Published on Dec 1, 2016 | FutureofHealthTech
Gary Kreps at 20th Future of Health Technology Summit at MIT

Are Chemicals killing us?

Published May 21, 2009 | STATSatGMU

Gary Kreps, Ph.D, Director of the Center for Health and Risk Communication at George Mason talks about the challenges facing journalism in translating scientific research for the public, National Press Club, May 21, 2009

Communications Week

April 12, 2014 | LiberalArtsIUPUI

Annenberg Research Seminar

Published Jan. 25, 2012 | USCAnnenberg

Please join students and faculty for a presentation by Gary Kreps (Ph.D. Communication ’79), University Distinguished Professor, chair of the Department of Communication and director of the Center for Health and Risk Communication at George Mason University. His topic: “Examining the Health Information Seeking Behaviors of Korean American Immigrants: Implications for Communication Interventions and Cancer Control.”

From Dr. Kreps: “Korean American immigrants suffer from serious cancer-related health disparities, resulting in significantly higher mortality rates than for members of the general population. This multi-methodological research program examines the communication issues that contribute to these health disparities. Data gathered are being used to design evidence-based, culturally sensitive, and community-based communication interventions to improve health outcomes. Implications will be drawn for development of a communication intervention model for reducing health disparities.”

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Jay M. Bernhardt

Dean, Moody College of Communication, The University of Texas at Austin
Founding Director, Center for Health Communication
Walter Cronkite Regents Chair | Everett D. Collier Centennial Chair

Dr. Jay Bernhardt is the 6th Dean of the Moody College of Communication at The University of Texas at Austin, one of the largest and highest ranked colleges of communication in the country. He is recognized internationally as a visionary leader, respected scholar, and innovative scientist in the application of communication, marketing, media to public health, healthcare, and medicine. Dr. Bernhardt serves on numerous national boards and four editorial boards. He is a member of six honor societies and and has received numerous awards for his scholarship and leadership.

Summary

Dr. Jay Bernhardt is the 6th Dean of the Moody College of Communication at The University of Texas at Austin, one of the largest and highest ranked colleges of communication in the country. He is recognized internationally as a visionary leader, respected scholar, and innovative scientist in the application of communication, marketing, media to public health, healthcare, and medicine. Dr. Bernhardt serves on numerous national boards and four editorial boards. He is a member of six honor societies and and has received numerous awards for his scholarship and leadership.

Information

Webpage:    commstudies.utexas.edu/faculty/jay-m-bernhardt
Twitter:  @jaybernhardt
LinkedIn    Blog
Full CV

Email:  moody.dean@austin.utexas.edu
Phone: 512-471-5646
Address: BMC 5.312
The University of Texas at Austin
Department of Communication Studies
2504A Whitis Ave. (A1105)
Austin, TX 78712-0115

Biosketch

Dr. Jay Bernhardt (Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1999; M.P.H., Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 1994) is the 6th Dean of the Moody College of Communication at The University of Texas at Austin, one of the largest and highest ranked colleges of communication in the country. Dr. Bernhardt also serves as the Founding Director of the Center for Health Communication and holds the Walter Cronkite Regents Chair and the DeWitt Carter Reddick Regents Chair in Communication. He is Adjunct Professor at The University of Texas School of Public Health. Before UT, Dr. Bernhardt served as Chair, Professor, and Center Director at the University of Florida in Gainesville, and previously served on the faculty of Emory University in Atlanta and the University of Georgia in Athens.

From 2005 to 2010, Dr. Bernhardt led health communication and marketing at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, managing a staff of more than 500 and a budget of more than $100 million. He is recognized internationally as a visionary leader, respected scholar, and innovative scientist in the application of communication, marketing, media to public health, healthcare, and medicine. Dr. Bernhardt serves on numerous national boards and four editorial boards. He is a member of six honor societies and and has received numerous awards for his scholarship and leadership.

Affiliations

Founding Director, Center for Health Communication, Moody College of Communication and Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin, 2014-Present.

Adjunct Professor, Austin Regional Campus, The University of Texas Health Science Center School of Public Health at Houston, September 2014-Present.

Selected Publications

Glowacki, E.M., Lazard, A.J., Wilcox, G.B., Mackert, M., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2016). Identifying the public’s concerns and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s reactions during a health crisis: An analysis of the CDC’s Zika live Twitter chat. American Journal of Infection Control. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2016.05.025

Livingood, W.C., Monticalvo, D., Bernhardt, J.N., Wells, K.T., Harris, T., Kee, K., Hayes, J., George, D., & Woodhouse, L.D. (2016). Engaging Adolescents Through Participatory and Qualitative Research Methods to Develop a Digital Communication Intervention to Reduce Adolescent Obesity, Health Education & Behavior. doi: 10.1177/1090198116677216

Mackert, M., Donovan, E., & Bernhardt J.M. (2016). Applied Grant Writing Training for Future Health Communication Researchers: The Health Communication Scholars Program. Health Communication. doi: 10.1080/10410236.2015.1110686.

Lazard, A., Scheinfeld, E., Bernhardt, J.M., Wilcox, G., & Suran, M. (2015). Detecting themes of public concern: a text mining analysis of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Ebola live Twitter chat. American Journal of Infection Control. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2015.05.025.

Alber, J., Watson, A., Barnett, T., Mercado, R., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2015). Development of a coding instrument to assess the quality and content of anti-tobacco video games. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 18(7): 417-425. doi:10.1089/cyber.2015.0051.

Hall, A. K., Bernhardt, J. M., & Dodd, V. (2015). Older adults use of online and offline sources of health information and constructs of reliance and self-efficacy for medical decision making. Journal of Health Communication, 20(7), 751-758. DOI:10.1080/10810730.2015.1018603.

Hall, A.K., Cole-Lewis, H., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2015). Mobile text messaging for health: A systematic review of reviews. Annual Review of Public Health, 36, 1-29.23. DOI: 10.1146/annurev-publhealth-031914-122855.

Bernhardt, J.M., Alber, J., & Gold, R.S. (2014). A primer on social media for professionals: digital dos and don’ts. Health Promotion Practice. DOI: 10.1177/1524839913517235.

Bernhardt, J.M., Mays, D., & Hall, A.K. (2012). Social marketing at the right place and right time with new media. Journal of Social Marketing, 2, 2, 130-137.

Hall, A.K., Stellefson, M., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2012) Healthy Aging 2.0: The potential of new media and technology. Preventing Chronic Disease, 9, 110241. DOI: 10.5888/pcd9.110241.

Bernhardt, J.M., Mays, D., & Kreuter, M. (2011). Dissemination 2.0: Closing the gap between knowledge and practice with new media and marketing. Journal of Health Communication, 16s1, 32-44.

Bernhardt, J.M., Usdan, S., Mays, D., Arriola, K.J., Martin, R.J., Cremeens, J., & Arriola, K.J. (2009). Alcohol assessment among college students using wireless mobile technology. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 70, 771-775.

Bernhardt, J.M., Mays, D., Eroğlu, D., & Daniel, K.L. (2009) New communication channels: Changing the nature of customer engagement, Social Marketing Quarterly, 15, 7-15.

Kreuter, M.W., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2009). Reframing the dissemination challenge: A marketing and distribution perspective. American Journal of Public Health, 99, 2123-2127.

Lyon Daniel, K., Bernhardt, J.M., & Eroglu, D., (2009). Social marketing and health communication: From people to places, American Journal of Public Health, 99, 2120-2122.

Mays, D., Bernhardt, J.M. et al. (2009). Development and validation of the Retrospective Alcohol Context Scale, American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 35, 109-114.

Mays, D., Klaiman, T., Kumanyika, S., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2008). A call to action to address diversity in public health professional preparation, Journal of Diversity in Health and Social Care, 8, 207-214.

Hayden, J., Cottrell, R., & Bernhardt, J.M. (2008). Ascending the career ladder, with Dr. Jay Bernhardt. Health Promotion Practice, 9, 1, 12-15.

Bernhardt, J.M., Usdan, S., Mays, D., Arriola, K.J., Martin, R.J., Cremeens, J., McGill, T., & Weitzel, J.A. (2007). Alcohol assessment using wireless handheld computers: A pilot study. Addictive Behaviors, 32, 12, 3065-3070.

Weitzel, J.A., Bernhardt, J.M., Usdan, S., Mays, D., & Glanz, K. (2007). Using wireless handheld computers and tailored text messaging to reduce negative consequences of drinking alcohol. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 68, 534-537.

Bernhardt, J.M. (2006). Improving health through Health Marketing. Preventing Chronic Disease, 3, 1-3.

Bernhardt, J.M., Usdan, S.L., & Burnett, A. (2005). Using handheld computers for daily alcohol assessment: Results from a pilot study. Journal of Substance Use, 10, 347-353.

Bernhardt, J.M. (2004). Communication at the core of effective public health. American Journal of Public Health, 94, 12, 2051-2053.

Bernhardt, J.M., & Felter, E.M. (2004). Online pediatric information seeking among mothers of young children: Results from a qualitative study using focus groups. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 6, e7.

Bernhardt, J.M., Lariscy, R.A., Parrott, R.L., Silk, K.J., & Felter, E.M. (2002). Perceived barriers to Internet-based health communication on human genetics. Journal of Health Communication, 7, 4, 325-340.

Bernhardt, J.M., Strecher, V.J., Bishop, K., Potts, P., Madison, E.M., & Thorp, J. (2001). Handheld computer-assisted self-interviews: User comfort level and preferences. American Journal of Health Behavior, 25, 6, 557-563.

Bernhardt, J.M., Sorenson, J.R., & Brown, J.D. (2001). When the perpetrator gets killed: Effects of a televised narrative anti-violence public service announcement. Health Education & Behavior, 28, 1, 81-94.

Bernhardt, J.M., & Hubley, J. (2001). Health education and the Internet: The start of a revolution. Health Education Research, 16, 6.

Bernhardt, J.M. (2000). Health education and the digital divide: Building bridges and filling chasms. Health Education Research, 15, 527-531.

Interview with Gary Kreps

Saturday April, 29, 2017

Fairfax Hyatt Regency, Fairfax, VA
Link to Award post

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=poa0WGSxvj0

Atkin Award Presentation

Saturday April, 29, 2017 at noon
Fairfax Hyatt Regency, Fairfax, VA

Download (PDF, Unknown)

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Professor of Communication and Associate Dean for Research, College of Communication and Information, University of Kentucky

Dr. Harringto  also holds an academic appointment in the School of Public Health and is a faculty associate of the Multidisciplinary Center on Drug and Alcohol Research.

Dr. Harrington’s research focuses on persuasive message design in the health behavior change context, particularly as it relates to risk behavior prevention/health promotion and interactive, tailored health communication using computer technology.

Specialties
Health communication, persuasive message design, tailored messaging, physician-patient communication

Summary

Dr. Harringto  also holds an academic appointment in the School of Public Health and is a faculty associate of the Multidisciplinary Center on Drug and Alcohol Research.

Dr. Harrington’s research focuses on persuasive message design in the health behavior change context, particularly as it relates to risk behavior prevention/health promotion and interactive, tailored health communication using computer technology.

Specialties
Health communication, persuasive message design, tailored messaging, physician-patient communication

 

Information

UK web page: comm.uky.edu/people/37/   Curriculum Vitae
Personal Website: http://comm.uky.edu/harrington

Email: Nancy.Harrington@uky.edu
Phone:  859-257-2295
Address: 249 Grehan
Lexington, KY 40506-0042

She also holds an academic appointment in the School of Public Health and is a faculty associate of the Multidisciplinary Center on Drug and Alcohol Research. Dr. Harrington’s research focuses on persuasive message design in the health behavior change context, particularly as it relates to risk behavior prevention/health promotion and interactive, tailored health communication using computer technology.

Biosketch

Nancy Grant Harrington received her PhD in 1992 from the University of Kentucky. She is the Douglas A. and Carole A. Boyd Professor of Communication and Associate Dean for Research in the College of Communication and Information, University of Kentucky. She also holds an academic appointment in the School of Public Health and is a faculty associate of the Multidisciplinary Center on Drug and Alcohol Research.

She has been a principal investigator, co-investigator, or principal evaluator on several NIH-funded and CDC-funded studies totaling nearly $8.5 million. She has published close to 60 journal articles or chapters in outlets such as Health Communication, Communication Monographs, Communication Yearbook, and Health Education & Behavior. She is co-editor of eHealth Applications: Promising Strategies for Behavior Change (Routledge, 2012) and editor of Health Communication: Theory, Method, and Application (Routledge, 2015). Dr. Harrington serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including Health Communication, Prevention Science, Science Communication, and Journal of Public Health Research She served as guest editor for special issues of Journal of Communication (“Communication Strategies to Reduce Health Disparities,” 2013) and Health Communication (“Message Design in Health Communication Research,” 2015). She served as chair to the Health Communication division of the National Communication Association from 2004-2005. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in persuasive message design, health communication, interpersonal communication, communication theory, and research methods.

Awards

NCA Health Communication Interest Group Dale E. Brashers Distinguished Mentor Award. 2016; University of Cincinnati’s “50 Communication Alumni Champions” 2014

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Scott Ratzan

VP Global Corporate Affairs, Anheuser-Busch InBev

Research Interests:  Public health, mobile health communication, and health literacy

Scott Ratzan has made major contributions to improve public health. Pioneer in health literacy and mobile health communication. Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives. Member: Board of Scientific Counsellors, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office of Infectious Disease; RAND Health Advisory Board; Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global Health Advisory Board. Vice-Chair, health, Business Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD. Adjunct Professor, Columbia Univ. Mailman School of Public Health. Appointments at Tufts Univ. School of Medicine and George Washington Univ. School of Public Health and Health Services.

Summary

Scott Ratzan has made major contributions to improve public health. Pioneer in health literacy and mobile health communication. Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives. Member: Board of Scientific Counsellors, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office of Infectious Disease; RAND Health Advisory Board; Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global Health Advisory Board. Vice-Chair, health, Business Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD. Adjunct Professor, Columbia Univ. Mailman School of Public Health. Appointments at Tufts Univ. School of Medicine and George Washington Univ. School of Public Health and Health Services.

Information

Tufts web page:  medicine.tufts.edu/Education/
LinkedIn

Email:  sratzan2@its.jnj.com
Phone:  609.917.4281
Address:

 

Biosketch

Dr. Scott C. Ratzan is Vice President, Global Health, Johnson & Johnson. In this role, he is charged with promoting communication, innovation and programs that focus on health literacy and public health policy. He is a pioneer in the areas of health literacy and mHealth communication, having co-authored the definition that serves as the basis for U.S. health literacy efforts.

Additionally, Dr. Ratzan is the Editor-in-Chief of the peer-reviewed Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives.  He also serves as co-chair of the United Nations Secretary General’s Every Woman Every Child Innovation Working Group and serves on the Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  He is a member of the U.S. Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Health Literacy, serves on the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Well-Being and Mental Health, and is a former Ambassador for global health research selected by Research!America.

He advocates for better health in multiple ways. In 2011, he presented the industry’s “Framework for Action for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases” at the UN General Assembly interactive hearing.  In 2010, he was invited to testify before the US Congressional Committee on “Achieving the United Nations Millennium Development Goals: Progress through Partnerships.”    And recently, he presented at the Harvard Kennedy School Women and Public Policy Board on Global Health Diplomacy.

Dr. Ratzan joined Johnson & Johnson in 2002 as Vice President, Government Affairs-Europe, based in Brussels with responsibility for Government Affairs and Policy issues related to pharmaceuticals in the Europe, Middle East and Africa region as well as in global health initiatives such as HIV.  Prior to joining Johnson & Johnson, he was Senior Technical Adviser in the Bureau of Global Health at the United States Agency for International Development, (USAID), where he developed the global health communication strategy for U.S. funded efforts in 65 countries.

Dr. Ratzan maintains faculty appointments at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, Tufts University School of Medicine and George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services.  Previously, he has been on faculty at the Yale School of Medicine, the University of Cambridge Judge Business School and the College of Europe.

Dr. Ratzan has appeared on Good Morning America and Nightline as well as published articles in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Financial Times and in academic journals. His books include the Mad Cow Crisis: Health and the Public Good, Attaining Global Health: Challenges and Opportunities, and AIDS: Effective Health Communication for the 90s. He also has delivered many presentations including the Leiter lecture on Quality Health Communication for the National Library of Medicine and an address on risk communication for the National Cancer Institute that was selected in Vital Speeches of the Day.  Dr. Ratzan also has drafted “Maxims for Effective Communication on Health and Risk Issues” that was published as part of a World Health Organization Consultation in 1998.

Education

Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
Doctor of Medicine (MD)
1988

Harvard University Kennedy School of Government
Master of Public Administration (MPA) Field Of Study Government
1985 – 1987

Emerson College
Degree Name Master of Arts (M.A.) Field Of Study Communication
Dates attended or expected graduation 1985 – 1986

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Professor and Department Chair, Department of Communication, College of Communication and Information, University of Kentucky

Hub Tags: Health Communication Hub | eHealth | Health Promotion

Interests: communication strategies to improve cancer prevention and detection behaviors

Dr. Cohen's work has appeared in Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, Health Communication, Journal of Communication, Journal of Health Communication, New Media and Society, Qualitative Health Research, and Prometheus. She is also editor of Communication Yearbook.

Summary

Hub Tags: Health Communication Hub | eHealth | Health Promotion

Interests: communication strategies to improve cancer prevention and detection behaviors

Dr. Cohen’s work has appeared in Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, Health Communication, Journal of Communication, Journal of Health Communication, New Media and Society, Qualitative Health Research, and Prometheus. She is also editor of Communication Yearbook.

Information

UK web pagehttp://comm.uky.edu/cohen/
Curriculum Vitae

Email:  elisia.cohen@uky.edu
Phone:  859-257-3622
Address:  228 Grehan Building
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY 40506

Biosketch

Education
B.A., 1997, University of Louisville; M.A., 1999, Wake Forest University; Ph.D., 2003, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Southern California

Specialties
Cancer communication; communication strategies to reduce health disparities; Health and risk communication; media effects; argumentation

Awards
Sarah Bennett Holmes Award, sponsored by the UK Women’s Forum 2014; College of Communication and Information Excellence in Research Award 2012; College of Communication and Information Science Excellence in Research Award 2009

Debriefing Panel Discussion

Health Intervention Strategies

Friday April 28, 2017
DCHC 2017 “Patient-Centered Health Communication” Conference

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=9&v=CTAcsrkAspk

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Anne M. Nicotera

Chair and Professor, Department of Communications, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, George Mason University

Dr. Nicotera focuses on health communication, nursing communication, communicative/interactive constitution of organization, race and gender, diversity, and culture and organizations.

 

Summary

Chair and Professor, Department of Communications, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, George Mason University

Dr. Nicotera focuses on health communication, nursing communication, communicative/interactive constitution of organization, race and gender, diversity, and culture and organizations.

 

Information

Webpage:  communication.gmu.edu/people/anicoter
Twitter:  twitter.com/annemnicotera

Email: anicoter@gmu.edu
Phone: 703.993.8296
Address: Robinson Hall A 307B
Fairfax, Va. 22030

 

Biosketch

Anne Maydan Nicotera (PhD, Ohio University) is a Professor and Chair in the Department of Communication at George Mason University, where she teaches courses in organizational and interpersonal communication. Her research is grounded in a constitutive perspective and focuses on culture and conflict, diversity, race and gender, and aggressive communication, with a particular interest in healthcare organizations. She has published her research in numerous national journals. She has also published five books and several chapters.  She has developed a theory and associated measurement tool for a construct called structurational divergence, which describes the intractable organizational conflicts that can result from the simultaneous application of multiple meanings in intra- and inter-professional interactions. She is also interested in the application of structurational divergence models to cultural competence training for healthcare practitioners who serve traditionally marginalized populations.

 

Current Research

The examination of communication among nurses and other healthcare professionals, especially in hospital settings, and the unique organizational design and form of hospitals.

 

Selected Publications

Nicotera, A.M., Mahon, M.M., & Wright, K.B. (in press). Communication that builds teams: Assessing a nursing conflict intervention. Nursing Administration Quarterly.

Nicotera, A.M., Zhao, X., Mahon, M.M., Peterson, E., Kim, W., & Conway-Morana, P. (in press). Structurational divergence theory as explanation for troublesome outcomes in nursing communication. Health Communication.

Nicotera, A.M., & Mahon, M.M. (2013). Exploring the impact of structurational divergence in nursing. Management Communication Quarterly, 27, 90-120.

Nicotera, A.M. (2013). Organizations as entitative beings: Some ontological implications of communicative constitution. In F. Cooren & D. Robichaud.What is an organization? Materiality, Agency, and Discourse. New York, NY: Erlbaum

Nicotera, A.M., Steele, J., Catalani, A., & Simpson, N. (2012). Conceptualization and test of an aggression competence model. Communication Research Reports, 29, 12-25.

Nicotera, A.M., Mahon, M.M., & Zhao, X. (2010). Conceptualization and measurement of structurational divergence in the healthcare setting. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 38, 362-385.

Nicotera, A.M., & Clinkscales, M.C.  (2010). Nurses at the nexus: A case study in structurational divergence. Health Communication25, 32-49.

Putnam, L.L., & Nicotera, A. M. (Eds.). (2009). Building theories of organization: The constitutive role of communication. New York: Routledge.

 

Courses

Fall 2016

WMST 300-006:
Topics in Commumincation and Gender
04:30 PM to 07:10 PM R

COMM 465-001:
Topics in Comm and Gender
04:30 PM to 07:10 PM R

Previous courses

COMM 200 Introduction to Communication
COMM 301 Foundations of Interpersonal Communication
COMM 401 Interpersonal Communication in the Workplace
COMM 335 Organizational Communication
COMM 530 Theories of Small Group Communication
COMM 600 Introduction to Graduate Studies
COMM 634 Theories of Interpersonal Communication
COMM 635 Foundations of Organizational Communication

Dissertations Supervised

Kristen L. Willett, A Wife or a Patient: Fibromyalgia Patients’ Communication Behaviors Regarding Social Support and Coping (2015)

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Elizabeth Glowacki

PhD student, Moody College of Communication, University of Texas at Austin

Hub Tags: Health Communication Hub | Health Care Deliver  | eHealth |  Health Promotion

Interests:  Provider-patient communication, the use of personal and electronic medical health records, messages about weight management and problematic substance use in romantic couples and families, the relationship between physical activity and cognitive performance, and health promotion efforts within schools.

Summary

Hub Tags: Health Communication Hub | Health Care Deliver  | eHealth |  Health Promotion

Interests:  Provider-patient communication, the use of personal and electronic medical health records, messages about weight management and problematic substance use in romantic couples and families, the relationship between physical activity and cognitive performance, and health promotion efforts within schools.

Information

Web:   UT page  Google Scholar    Research Gate

Email: glowacki@utexas.edu
Address: Austin, TX

Biosketch

Education

BA Degree: English and Communication, Boston College
MA Degree: University of Texas at Austin, Interpersonal Communication

Panel Presentation and Discussion

An evaluation of linguistic agency assignment in text messages about health

Satuday April 29, 2017
DCHC 2017 “Patient-Centered Health Communication” Conference

Conclusions: Participants who received text messages in which health behavior agency was assigned to non-humans (i.e., STIs, fruits/vegetables) were more likely to report complying with the recommended health behaviors.

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Denise K. Scannell

Chief Strategist - Health Communication, MITRE

Serves as chief strategist for MITRE's Health Communication capability and leads oversight of MITRE's health communication project work and research initiatives.

Hub Tags: Health Communication Hub | Health Care Delivery | Health Systems | eHealth | Health Risk Communication | Health Promotion | Organizational Communication | Family Communication | Patient Communication |Health Policy

Interests: Social Support | Health Safety |Health Privacy

Summary

Hub Tags: Health Communication Hub | Health Care Delivery | Health Systems | eHealth | Health Risk Communication | Health Promotion | Organizational Communication | Family Communication | Patient Communication |Health Policy

Interests: Social Support | Health Safety |Health Privacy

Information

Web:    LinkedIn

Email:  dkmiller@mitre.org

Biosketch

Lead oversight for developing and refining the MITRE Health Communication capability and applied research initiatives focusing on the examination of the pragmatic influences of human interaction and behavior on the provision of healthcare, quality of healthcare delivery, and health promotion. Serve as chief advisor to government sponsors, project leaders, and leadership on the oversight, strategy, and application of Health Communication to project initiatives, and the quality of the related work.

Education

George Mason University
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Health Communication
2009 – 2014

Montclair State University
M.A., Communication
1997 – 1999

Rutgers University
BA, Journalism and English
1990 – 1994

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Chief, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, National Cancer Institute

Research Interests: Health communication, behavioral research, informatics research, human system integration

Hesse was appointed Chief of the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch (HCIRB) in November, 2006. He served as the Acting Chief of HCIRB from 2004-06.

Brad’s professional focus is bringing the power of health information technologies to bear on the problem of eliminating death and suffering from cancer, a cause to which he remains steadfastly dedicated.

While at the NCI, he has championed several initiatives that evaluate and progress the science of cancer communication and informatics, including the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) and the Centers of Excellence in Cancer Communication (CECCR).

Summary

Hesse was appointed Chief of the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch (HCIRB) in November, 2006. He served as the Acting Chief of HCIRB from 2004-06.

Brad’s professional focus is bringing the power of health information technologies to bear on the problem of eliminating death and suffering from cancer, a cause to which he remains steadfastly dedicated.

While at the NCI, he has championed several initiatives that evaluate and progress the science of cancer communication and informatics, including the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) and the Centers of Excellence in Cancer Communication (CECCR).

Information

NCI web pagestaffprofiles.cancer.gov/brp/prgmStaffProfile

Email: hesseb@mail.nih.gov
Phone: 240-276-6721
Address:

Biosketch

As director of NCI’s biennial Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), Brad is responsible for leading a team of scientists in the development and execution of this nationally representative, general population survey of American adults. HINTS, now entering its fifth iteration, systematically evaluates the public’s knowledge, attitudes and behaviors relevant to cancer control in an environment of rapidly changing communication technologies.

Dr. Hesse also served as the program director for NCI’s Centers of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research (CECCR). This initiative supports the research of four centers aimed at increasing the knowledge of, tools for, access to, and use of cancer communications by the public, patients, survivors, and health professionals. The centers have been instrumental in defining the next generation of interdisciplinary collaboration in cancer communication science.

Prior to his work at NCI, Dr. Hesse conducted research in the interdisciplinary fields of human computer interaction, health communication, medical informatics, and computer-supported decision making. In 1988, he served as a postdoctoral member of the Committee for Social Science Research on Computing at Carnegie Mellon University, and subsequently co-founded the Center for Research on Technology at the American Institutes for Research in Palo Alto, California, in 1991. Working in a contract environment before coming to NCI, Dr. Hesse directed projects for the Departments of Education and Labor, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Institutes of Health. He has also provided usability services to Apple Computer, Hewlett Packard, Xerox, Microsoft, Sun, and Netscape.

Dr. Hesse currently serves on the board of advisers for the American Psychological Association’s online resource, PsycINFO, and is a member of the American Psychological Society, the Association for Computing Machineries, Special Interest Group on Human Computer Interaction (SIG-CHI), the American Medical Informatics Association, the International Communication Association, and the Usability Professionals Association.

Current and past BRP mentees include Lila Finney Rutten, Alexandra Greenberg and Susana Ramirez.

Experience

Chief, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch
National Cancer Institute
2003 – Present
Westat Senior Scientist
Westat
Jul 1999 – Jul 2003

Education

University of Utah
Ph.D. Psychology
1982 – 1988

Brigham Young University
BS Psychology
1975 – 1982

Selected Publications & Presentations

Hesse, B. W., Ahern, D. K., & Beckjord, E. (Eds.) Oncology Informatics: Using Health Information Technology to Improve Processes and Outcomes in Cancer. 2016.

Hesse, B. W., Greenberg, A. J., & Rutten, L. F. The Role of Internet Resources in Clinical Oncology: Promises and Challenges. Nat Rev Clin Oncol 2016.

Hesse, B. W., Moser, R. P., & Riley, W. T. From Big Data to Knowledge in the Social Sciences. Ann Am Acad Polit Soc Sci 2015; 659:16-32.

Hesse, B.W. Decisional Architectures. Handbook of Health Decision Science. 2016.

Hesse, B. W., Beckjord, E., Rutten, L. J., Fagerlin, A., & Cameron, L. D. Cancer communication and informatics research across the cancer continuum. Am Psychol 2015; 70(2):198-210.

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