Open Science Initiative conferences

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Photo taken at GMU Fairfax campus at OSI 2016.

Summary

The Open Scholarship Initiative (OSI) brings together a diverse and high-level group of scholarly publishing decision makers from around the globe into a series of annual meetings that are thoughtfully designed and constructed so these leaders can personally share their ideas and perspectives and look for common ground and actionable solutions.

OSI is managed by the National Science Communication Institute (nSCI) in long-term partnership with UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization). GMU Communications and Press Forward hosted the first of 10 annual conferences.

 

Summary

The Open Scholarship Initiative (OSI)  brings together a diverse and high-level group of scholarly publishing decision makers from around the globe into a series of annual meetings that are thoughtfully designed and constructed so these leaders can personally share their ideas and perspectives and look for common ground and actionable solutions.

OSI is managed by the National Science Communication Institute (nSCI) in long-term partnership with UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization). GMU Communications and Press Forward hosted the first of 10 annual conferences.

 

Information

Website: http://osinitiative.org/

 

About

What should the future of scholarly publishing look like? How about open access? Who should decide? Can journals become more affordable and accessible? Will journals continue to serve as the primary means of communicating research? Can institutional repositories work together more effectively to integrate the world’s knowledge? Finding the answers to these and other related questions is important for research growth, research funding, public education and policy development, global economic development, global information access and equity, and more. And there are many different stakeholder groups working to find the answers. But not together, and not until now.

The Open Scholarship Initiative (OSI) is an ambitious, global effort to establish high level dialogue and cooperation on these issues.

OSI brings together a diverse and high-level group of scholarly publishing decision makers from around the globe into a series of annual meetings that are thoughtfully designed and constructed so these leaders can personally share their ideas and perspectives and look for common ground and actionable solutions. Ideas generated at each meeting are refined throughout the year through a broadening circle of delegate voices, and can be formalized into decisions at annual meetings over the next 10 years, with the goal of ensuring that solutions are workable and widely adopted, and that new and remaining issues are continually reviewed and agreed-to solutions are fine-tuned.

Conference delegates who are being identified and invited to participate in these meetings are C-level representatives from key stakeholder groups in scholarly publishing around the world, representing governments, journal publishing, open access, universities and research institutions, faculty groups, scholarly societies, libraries, research funders, regulatory agencies, public policy groups, STEM education groups, journalism, and more. Around 225 such delegates committed to attend OSI2016, with the final attendance numbers dropping to about 195 due to last-minute schedule conflicts (as happens with a group of high-level delegates).

IDENTIFYING THE PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

The Open Scholarship Initiative originated from the efforts of nSCI, a US-based nonprofit. Between October 2014 and January 2015, nSCI convened and moderated an online conversation between 120 open access stakeholders, including many thought leaders in open access, publishing, and scholarly communications. This conversation, which began as the “Open Science Initiative,” resulted in the recommendations below, as well as a post-discussion partnership with UNESCO to expand this effort globally as the Open Scholarship Initiative, broadening the focus both geographically and intellectually. For more details about the Open Science Initiative’s discussions and recommendations, see the group’s working paper at http://bit.ly/1DJwRLT

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Post Curator

The lead curator for this Open Science Initiative conferences post is eolson.

If you have any content you would like to add to this post, submit it to eric@pressforward.org.

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